Great news: U.S. sends experts to reason with Uganda on homosexuality

Great news: U.S. sends experts to reason with Uganda on homosexuality

[Ed. – So much more important than those pesky national borders or nuclear weapons.]

The Ugandan president committed to meeting with American “experts” on homosexuality to try to change his mind about the Anti-Homosexuality Act signed into law last month, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said on Tuesday during a forum at the State Department moderated by BuzzFeed.

Museveni claimed to have signed the law, which imposes up to a lifetime prison sentence for homosexuality, after being convinced no one is “born gay.”

“I talked personally to President Museveni just a few weeks ago, and he committed to meet with some of our experts so that we could engage him in a dialogue as to why what he did could not be based on any kind of science or fact, which is what he was alleging,” Kerry said. “He welcomed that and said that he was happy to receive them and we can engage in that kind of conversation… maybe we can reach a point of reconsideration.”

Kerry suggested this conversation was an example of the “tailored approach” the State Department is now developing to respond to anti-LGBT laws currently in place in around 80 countries worldwide. Shortly before his remarks, the Congressional Black Caucus sent a letter to Kerry urging it to examine relations with all countries with anti-LGBT laws, not just Uganda.

In response to a question about what the State Department was doing to guide its response to the Uganda law and U.S. aid to the country, Kerry said the State Department was “formulating those guidelines right now.” Sources on Capitol Hill have said the Obama administration has kept lawmakers in the dark about how it intends to respond to the Uganda situation.

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