Reminder: British were coming to disarm Massachusetts in 1775

Reminder: British were coming to disarm Massachusetts in 1775

Early morning on September 1, 1774, [British colonial governor] Gage’s troops would seize hundreds of barrels of gun powder from the Charleston powder house. The colonists did not take this show of force lightly. By the end of the day over 20,000 armed colonists, aged 16 to 60, began to march their way to Boston. The colonists were sending a message, if the government was going to use the force of government to take their arms and powder, the colonist would take that to be an act of war! The colonists were now going to “ready themselves”.

Just five days after Gage’s act of war against the colonists, the militia of Worchester County took over their government from the rule of the King. Replacing all leaders appointed by the king with those selected by the people.

The same day in Suffolk County, the people gathered together, issued a list of nineteen grievances against the government, and then promptly took all control of the militia away from the Governor and vowed to have open arms training every single day. The First Continental Congress unanimously endorsed the Suffolk grievances and encouraged all other colonies to send aid to those in Boston. …

In response to the colonists stand against the government, Governor Gage ordered his men to conduct warrantless searches on the colonists seizing their arms and ammunition.

Lord Dartmouth, the Royal Secretary of State for America ordered Gage to disarm the people. Gage told Dartmouth that it would not be possible to control the colonists without force. Dartmouth then sent a letter to George III asking to have all import of weapons and ammunition to the colonies stopped. George fulfilled this request by requiring a permit for all exports of arms and ammunition from Great Britain and then refused to issue those permits.

The Boston Committee of Correspondence received information that the government was getting ready to seize all the ammunition, arms, and cannons from fort William and Mary, and the militia was able to take possession of these items before the government.

Parliament was getting really concerned.

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