Mother of slain SEAL on Extortion 17 hearing: ‘It was a travesty of justice’

Mother of slain SEAL on Extortion 17 hearing: ‘It was a travesty of justice’

In August 2011, thirty warriors, including 17 members of SEAL Team 6 who were responsible for killing Osama bin Laden a mere three months prior, were killed in what was the worst loss of life in the Afghanistan campaign since it began in 2001.

During today’s long awaited congressional hearing on Extortion 17, some of the lingering concerns were addressed, but unfortunately many questions remain, as discussed in detail at the Examiner.

For the families of the lost heroes, it is difficult to imagine their loss. There are no words…

The hearing disproportionately focused on government services for family members who have lost loved ones in war,  which this author guesses must have been inconceivable for family members who genuinely want answers surrounding the circumstances of the death of their loved ones at the hands of the Taliban.

Another irritating talking point was made repeatedly that some family members did not want a hearing. Of course, perhaps this is true, but it is a bit surprising. Indeed, Karen Vaughn, the mother of slain SEAL Aaron Vaughn tweeted in part, “I haven’t spoken to a single parent who didn’t want one.”

Although the hearing was surely appreciated and Rep. Jason Chaffetz showed genuine concern for the families, Mrs. Vaughn did not seem to believe that the hearing was forthcoming. In fact, she referred to it as a “travesty of justice.”

For more on today’s congressional hearing, read my story at the Examiner.


Renee Nal

Renee Nal

Renee Nal is a co-founder of TavernKeepers.com, a news and political commentary site founded by former Glenn Beck interns. She is also the National Conservative Examiner. Renee is an associate producer for Trevor Loudon's political documentary, 'The Enemies Within.'

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