AZ gov., perhaps believing myths, vetoes religious freedom bill

AZ gov., perhaps believing myths, vetoes religious freedom bill

On Wednesday evening, Arizona Governor Jan Brewer (R) deliberately misread Arizona SB 1062 — and, out of a misguided sense of political correctness, proceeded to veto it. “My agenda is to sign into law legislation that advances Arizona,” Brewer said, in a massive cop-out avoiding the central issue of protection of religious freedom.

Brewer stated that the bill “could divide Arizona in ways we could not even imagine and no one would ever want.” Of course, her veto of the bill is even more divisive, given that it now sends the message that it is open season on private religious business owners who wish to live out their religious principles throughout their lives, not just within the four walls of their churches or homes. …

Here, then, are 7 myths the left has told about the Arizona religious freedom law – and why they’re myths:

Arizona’s Law Loosens Discrimination Against Gays and Lesbians in The State.

Adam Serwer of MSNBC says that “‘religious freedom laws could be a license to discrimination.” That’s nonsense. Arizona state law has no provision currently barring discrimination against gays and lesbians. So what does the law do? It actually narrows the law with regard to supposed discrimination against gays and lesbians.

Allowing Private Businesses to Discriminate Among Customers Is Like Jim Crow.

Outspoken gay activist and former actor George Takei has called Arizona a “Jim Crow state” thanks to the law. Even Fox News’ Andrea Tantaros has jumped on the bandwagon, stating, “I don’t know why you want to bring Jim Crow laws back to the forefront for homosexuals,” prompting host Martha MacCallum to state, “I mean, that’s exactly what it sounds like.”

No, it doesn’t. Private discrimination may be nasty and evil, but it is not and was not Jim Crow. Jim Crow laws mandated segregation in public areas.

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