Microstamping law driving S&W out of California

Microstamping law driving S&W out of California

Smith & Wesson announced Wednesday that it would rather stop selling its handguns in California than comply with the state’s new microstamping law, which “requires that all new semi-automatic pistols that are not already on the state’s approved gun roster have the microstamping technology,” The Washington Times reports.

AWR Hawkins explains what the technology is:

Microstamping is a requirement that each firearm be fitted with a special firing pin that leaves a fingerprint on a bullet casing which differs from the fingerprint of every other firearm. In other words–every one of the wildly popular Smith & Wesson M&P .45 semi-automatic handguns would have to be manufactured in such a way so that no two of them left the same mark on a shell casing.

However, independent studies have shown that microstamping is unreliable and ineffective for law enforcement, not to mention costly for manufacturers.

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