5 things to know about A-Rod lawsuit

5 things to know about A-Rod lawsuit

WHAT IS RODRIGUEZ CLAIMING? His lawsuit accused the Major League Baseball Players Association of “bad faith,” said its representation during the hearing was “perfunctory at best” and accused it of failing to attack a civil suit filed by MLB in Florida state court as part of its Biogenesis investigation. His lawyers criticized Michael Weiner, the union head who died from a brain tumor in November, for saying last summer he recommended Rodriguez settle for a lesser penalty if MLB were to offer an acceptable length. The suit claimed Major League Baseball engaged in “ethically challenged behavior” and was the source of media leaks in violation of baseball’s confidentiality rules. It said Horowitz acted “with evident partiality” and “refused to entertain evidence that was pertinent and material.” And it faulted Horowitz for denying Rodriguez’s request to have a different arbitrator hear the case, for not ordering baseball Commissioner Bud Selig to testify and for allowing Biogenesis of America founder Anthony Bosch to claim Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination in refusing to answer questions during cross-examination.

WHAT WAS THE REACTION? Former major league All-Star Tony Clark, who took over from Weiner as the union head, issued a statement saying “it is unfortunate that Alex Rodriguez has chosen to sue the players’ association. His claim is completely without merit, and we will aggressively defend ourselves and our members from these baseless charges. The players’ association has vigorously defended Mr. Rodriguez’s rights throughout the Biogenesis investigation, and indeed throughout his career. Mr. Rodriguez’s allegation that the association has failed to fairly represent him is outrageous, and his gratuitous attacks on our former executive director, Michael Weiner, are inexcusable. When all is said and done, I am confident the players’ association will prevail.”

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