The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. —THOMAS JEFFERSON, 1788

How much porn should high school students read? Common Core Curriculum answers

Cristina Garcia

Cristina Garcia

Paging the Detroit mother who boycotted the reading of Anne Frank’s “Diary of a Young Girl” by her daughter’s seventh-grade class on the grounds that it’s pornographic. Get a load of what tenth graders at Buena High School in Sierra Vista, Ariz., were reading up until this past week. Rather than just give the book’s title, here is a small sampling of the content courtesy of EAGNews:

Hugo and Felicia stripped in their room, dissolving easily into one another, and made love against the whitewashed walls. Hugo bit Felicia’s breast and left purplish bands of bruises on her upper thighs. He knelt before her in the tub and massaged black Spanish soap between her legs. He entered her repeatedly from behind.

Felicia learned what pleased him. She tied his arms above his head with their underclothing and slapping him sharply when he asked.

‘You’re my bitch,’ Hugo said, groaning.

In the morning he left, promising to return in the summer.

The district has since pulled the book from which this steamy passage was excerpted. The title is “Dreaming in Cuban,” and it is one of the recommended titles in the hotly debated “Common Core Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects.”

Dreaming in Cuban pagesSo what would prompt educators to place a book like this in the hands of high school students? One clue is the identity of the author, Cristina Garcia, who is (a) a woman, (b) of Cuban and Guatemalan extraction, and (c) grew up in an ethnically mixed neighborhood of New York City. She is in fine the poster child for diversity, multiculturalism, and feminism, all rolled into one. The fact that she occasionally uses potty mouth in her prose is quite irrelevant.

That is assuming, of course, that the developers of the Common Core Curriculum read the novel. Whether they did seems beside the point since, as EAG notes, supplemental material in the curriculum includes an interview with the author, who is pushing her latest oeuvre, “King of Cuba.” A promotional blurb for the book, which describes it as “darkly hilarious” reveals that its protagonist is an octogenarian living out his final years with “an active sex life.” Sounds even kinkier.

Related Articles

Follow me on Twitter or join me at Facebook.

Howard Portnoy has written for HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.

More by

Posting Policy
We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse. Read more.
You may use HTML in your comments. Feel free to review the full list of allowed HTML here.

  • jimof ct

    There is something truly deceptive in the advocacy of Common Core.
    The traditional role of schools seems to be absent. The propaganda aspect is increasingly at the forefront of concerns being raised by parents and teachers alike. The vicious reactions of the advocates and the governmental bureaucrats who are pushing this supposed reform program clearly indicates they are not open to the concerns of these parents or teachers,
    . It also seems quite apparent to me that the students aren’t getting much consideration in this approach either.
    Increased Testing (taking time away from teaching) and new unproven math techniques and dramatically revised emphasis in the choice of reading materials all of which impact the classroom and all are consistent with an agenda that does not include improving student learning.
    How there can be a positive outcome from such a radical and fiercely opposed approach escapes me.
    The simple fact that it is being “forced” under threat by Federal and State agencies is again a violation of the traditional notion of schools being run as close to the community they serve as is possible.

    I expect Increased homeschooling is one likely result and more failed schools is another.
    The more government bureaucrats involve themselves in defining what is “best for all”- the more likely the general outcome results will be reduced by the lowering of the common outcomes experienced.

    “American exceptional ism” is being threatened. Excellence in the school’s outcome needs to be given more priority at local levels and more challenging academic requirements should be the focus not the radical transformation of the system with influences imposed from governmental bureaucracies far removed from the classrooms and the parents and the students..