Green energy wind farm turbine kills rare bird

Green energy wind farm turbine kills rare bird

bok-birds-100512Green energy kills again…

Wind farm turbines may not register much of a carbon footprint, but they have been known to be less than friendly to our feathered friends as what happened in a freak accident in Great Britain was reported by Fox News.

The conventional wisdom present day is that green energy is environmentally friendly, yet ironically was the instrument of death for a wayward avian visitor to the United Kingdom.

Nearly 100 birdwatchers flocked to Scotland’s Outer Hebrides to catch a glimpse of the über-rare White-throated Needletail, which happened to be just a few hundred miles off course as it winged its way over the Sceptered Isle for the first time in over 22 years.

But instead of finding themselves in the throes of bird watching ecstasy, the “birdies” looked on in stunned silence as the solitary Hirundapus Caudacutus did a header straight into the blades of a reportedly “small” wind turbine.

Birdwatcher extraordinaire Josh Jones of England’s Bird Guides lamented:

It was seen by birders fly straight into the turbine.

It is ironic that after waiting so long for this bird to turn up in the UK, it was killed by a wind turbine and not a natural predator.

For whatever solace the Bird Guides of England may take in it, Fox News reported early last year that turbines at America’s wind farms kill over half a million birds per year, despite America’s wind power industry being in violation of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and the Eagle Protection Act.

As Bill Johns of the American Bird Conservancy rhetorically asked:

How does an industry kill more than 2,000 eagles and not be fined once?

It’s a head scratcher.


T. Kevin Whiteman

T. Kevin Whiteman

T. Kevin Whiteman is a retired Master Sergeant of Marines. He is the founder of the blog Unapologetically Rude and has written for Examiner and other blogs.

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