Macy’s mistakenly marked down $1,500 necklace to $47

Macy’s mistakenly marked down $1,500 necklace to $47
Caveat venditor
Caveat venditor

The New York-based retail giant Macy’s is famous for its one-day sales, where prices are slashed, but this is ridiculous. Dallas ABC affiliated WFAA reports that the retailer sent out a catalog to customers earlier this month advertising a $1,500 sterling silver and 14-karat gold necklace as a “SUPER BUY.” Just how super was it? The sale price — $47 — represents a savings of 97 percent.

The actual sale price was supposed to read “$479,” but the chain’s advertising department omitted the “9.” The report notes that a number of customers rushed to take advantage of the error before the store noticed it.

One who just missed out was a man named Robert Bernard, a customer at a Macy’s store in the Dallas area. When the person in front of him bought the last necklace in stock, the clerk arranged to have one shipped to Bernard. But the jewelry never arrived. Instead, he received a voice mail alerting him of the pricing mistake and notifying him that his order had been canceled.

Signage to that effect went up in the fine jewelry department and on store doors as well, says Beth Charlton, a Macy’s spokeswoman, who added, “For those customers who bought the necklace at the $47 price, they were fortunate.

Macy’s is not revealing how many necklaces they essentially gave away. Rumor has it, however, that the chain is looking for a new copy editor.

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Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy

Howard Portnoy has written for The Blaze, HotAir, NewsBusters, Weasel Zippers, Conservative Firing Line, RedCounty, and New York’s Daily News. He has one published novel, Hot Rain, (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), and has been a guest on Radio Vice Online with Jim Vicevich, The Alana Burke Show, Smart Life with Dr. Gina, and The George Espenlaub Show.

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