Wounded British soldier asks for 'boob flash' to help relieve pain

Wounded British soldier asks for 'boob flash' to help relieve pain

aaf2a1fe9e259d84c67b3018d3e1d776But only as a therapeutic measure…

When a British soldier was caught in a Taliban bomb blast that resulted in the loss of both legs, morphine injections weren’t enough to relieve the pain. So the wounded soldier asked one of the Army Medics treating him to further treat him to a British press tagged “boob flash” as reported by The Sun.

Private Emily Tomkins of 4 Medical Regiment, Royal Army Medical Corps, was one of the on-scene medics who immediately gave first aid to the severely wounded combat casualty.

As cited, the unidentified casualty was still in agonizing pain despite the morphine injection administered by Pvt. Tomkins.

After the Southampton-native explained that she couldn’t risk giving any more morphine despite his excruciating pain, he stated to the attractive blonde lifesaver, ”

Well do something useful and show me your boobs.”

Reportedly, Pvt. Tomkins refused the stimulating request of her fellow “Squaddie” (British slang for any given soldier), but her actions on-scene saved his life, thereby assuring her the Mention in Despatches bravery award for her conduct in action in Helmand, Afghanistan.

Soldiers of the British Empire or the Commonwealth of Nations who are mentioned in despatches but do not receive a medal for their action are nonetheless entitled to receive a certificate and wear a decoration.

Now back in her home base at the British Army Barracks in Aldershot, Hants, southwest of London, Pvt. Tomkins commented with typical British understatement, ”

I was just doing my job.”


T. Kevin Whiteman

T. Kevin Whiteman

T. Kevin Whiteman is a retired Master Sergeant of Marines. He is the founder of the blog Unapologetically Rude and has written for Examiner and other blogs.

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