6 reasons why the two-party system may become obsolete

6 reasons why the two-party system may become obsolete

“A revolution is brewing.” That was the first sentence spoken to me at a “No Labels” organizing session Sunday in New York City, and it struck a chord for two reasons.

First, No Labels is known as a well-intentioned but ineffectual centrist group launched two years ago to a collective shrug from cynical politicos. A No Labels convention might be the last place you’d expect to hear talk of a revolution.

Second, I agree that a revolution is brewing: a non-violent public upheaval that forces change from within the two-party structure or usurps it.

Before I explain, let’s deal with No Labels.

Two years ago, a group of high-powered political activists from both parties formed No Labels to encourage centrist problem-solving in an era of ideological gridlock. Mocked as naive and patronizing, the “Kumbaya Caucus” lacked a clear agenda and grassroots support.

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