The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. —THOMAS JEFFERSON, 1788

This week in hypocrisy: Al Gore

AlGoreThis past week, the web was abuzz over news that former Vice President Al Gore had emerged from his not-so-carbon-neutral mansion to sell his failing cable network, Current TV, to the Al Jazeera network.

While I’m going to miss all those anti-Mormon documentaries it has been running for the past year, the loss of Current means Americans will now be able to watch a new network that puts a positive spin on the darker side of Islam. Who doesn’t like that? Besides, now I can catch up on episodes of Al Jazeera’s hit sitcom “Everybody Loves Jihad.”

Focusing on the pro-terrorist network would be missing the point, however. This entire episode is a fascinating look at liberal hypocrisy in action. Consider this: Al Gore refused to sell Current TV to Glenn Beck, because he didn’t want him to destroy the channel’s liberal legacy. He then sells it to Al Jezeera, who proceeds to fire everyone anyway. But at least they don’t get to say Glenn Beck fired them.

Gore, a champion of the environment, makes $100 million on the deal, paid by the royal family of the country of Qatar (owners of Al Jazeera), who made their fortune through oil. Apparently, that evil blood money isn’t so bad when it’s in your pocket.

Finally, Gore then tries to make sure the deal is signed before December 31, to avoid Obama’s new higher tax rates on millionaires, rates he once called for himself when he ran for President. And yet, no howls from the liberal left that another millionaire has attempted to escape paying his fair share simply by following the rules. Since Al Gore is THEIR guy, they will swallow their disgust over this ordeal, and look the other way for the greater cause of liberal social progressivism, of which Al plays a big part. Forward!

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